Saturday, 6 June 2020

Guest Review: Ben Stokes On Fire By Ben Stokes

Early evening on Sunday 14th July 2019. Lord's Cricket Ground in London. Something had just happened in the sport of cricket that had never happened before: England had won the Cricket World Cup for the very first time since the tournament's inception in 1975. 
At the epicentre of England's historic triumph was Ben Stokes, the talismanic all-rounder with an insatiable appetite for The Big Occasion. He contributed an absolutely critical 84 runs off 98 balls when England batted, a seemingly nerveless innings of discipline and maturity. Thrillingly, it was enough to tie the scores at 241 runs each, so the match reverted to a Super Over - just six balls for each side to bat in the ultimate in sporting sudden death. Stokes and his batting partner, Jos Buttler, saw England to 15 runs off their over. When it was finally confirmed that Martin Guptill had been run out off the very last ball of New Zealand's Super Over with the scores once again level, England had astonishingly won on the boundary count-back, and the nation could finally breathe again.
Early evening on Sunday 25th August 2019. A sun-drenched Headingley in Leeds. Having been bowled out for just 67 earlier in the Third Test, England were facing the prospect of failing to regain the Ashes. In their second innings England were still 73 runs short of victory with a solitary wicket remaining. Australia were near certainties to retain the Ashes there and then. Cue one of the most amazing innings ever witnessed as Ben Stokes thrashed the Australian bowlers to all corners of the ground, in the process scoring 135 not out, driving England to a barely believable one-wicket victory and keeping the series very much alive. The nation took another breath. 
In his brand-new book, Ben Stokes tells the story of England's electrifying first ever Cricket World Cup triumph as well as this summer's momentous Ashes Test series. It is the ultimate insider's account of the most nerve-shredding but riveting three-and-a-half months in English cricket history.  


Review: During a remarkable summer of 2019, the England cricket team won the Cricket World Cup and contested a memorable Ashes Test Match series with Australia, drawing 2-2. Ben Stokes played a major part in both the World Cup and the Test Match series. This book is his story of that summer, with particular emphasis on two Sundays, July 14th and August 25th.

At the start of the World Cup tournament, England were the favourites. They were in good form going into the tournament and were playing on home soil. After a bit of a wobble during the group stage of the competition, England entered the final two matches of this stage needing to win them both if they were to progress to the semi-finals. This they achieved and, after winning their semi-final, they went through to the final against New Zealand at Lord’s on Sunday 14th July. Batting second, they were losing wickets at regular intervals whilst chasing down New Zealand’s score. Ben had come in after the fall of England’s third wicket and was determined to be there at the end to see England home. He describes the excitement of facing the 50th, and final, over when England needed 15 runs to win. Off the final ball, England needed two runs to win, but could manage only a single, meaning that, after both sides had batted for 50 overs, the scores were level. This meant that, for the first time in the history of the World Cup, the game went into a Super Over. Each team would bowl one further over to be faced by two nominated batsmen to decide the winner. England batted first, with Ben as one of the nominated batters, and scored 15. It was now New Zealand's turn to bat for one over. Again, needing two to win off the final ball, they managed only a single. This meant that the scores were tied, but the rules of the competition stated that in this event, the team scoring more boundaries during their innings would be declared the winner and, on boundary count-back, England had won the World Cup for the first time.

Following such a pulsating World Cup, it would have been difficult to predict that the rest of the summer would throw up more drama. However, the World Cup was followed by a series of five Test Matches against Australia for the Ashes. These matches are always fiercely contested. After losing the first match and drawing the second one, England went into the third match at Headingley knowing that should Australia win, they would retain the Ashes. This was looking highly likely when England, batting second, were dismissed for 67 in their first innings. Following their second innings, Australia posted a target of 359 runs for England to chase. Ben went in after the fall of the third wicket on the evening of the third day and was there at the close of play when England had scored 156. The fourth day was Sunday 25th August. England applied themselves to their batting but wickets were starting to fall. When the ninth wicket went down and the last batsman came to the crease to join Ben, England still required 73 runs to win. The following phase of play is the stuff of legends and is up there with a previous sensational victory England pulled off at the same venue in 1981.

Following England’s win at Headingley to level the series, Australia won the fourth Test, thereby retaining the Ashes, and England won the fifth and final Test.

The book is the author’s personal recollection of a truly memorable summer, with particular attention being paid to the pivotal role he played on those two aforementioned Sundays. I found reading the accounts of these matches as exciting as being there. (In fact, I had a ticket for the fifth day’s play of the Test Match at Headingley, but the match finished a day early.) I would recommend this book to all cricket lovers.

To order your copy now, just click the link: UK or US

Friday, 5 June 2020

Blog Tour: Interview With Ken Lussey Author of Eyes Turned Skywards @KenLussey @fledglingpress @lovebooksgroup #lovebookstours



Today is my stop on the blog tour for Eyes Turned Skywards by Ken Lussey. I have an interview with the author today and if you like the sound of that, you can click here to order your copy now. Don't forget to check out the other stops on the tour for more exclusive content and reviews. 

Here's what it's all about...

This novel reflects on the rumours and theories surrounding a number of real-life events, including the death of the Duke of Kent and the aircraft crashes of Short Sunderland W4032 and Avro Anson DJ106.



Wing Commander Robert Sutherland has left his days as a pre-war detective far behind him. Or so he thinks. On 25 August 1942 the Duke of Kent, brother of King George VI, is killed in northern Scotland in an unexplained air crash; a second crash soon after suggests a shared, possibly sinister, cause. Bob Sutherland is tasked with visiting the aircraft’s base in Oban and the first crash site in Caithness to gather clues as to who might have had reason to sabotage one, or both, of the aircraft.



Set against the background of a country that is far from united behind Winston Churchill, and the ever-present threat from the enemy, we follow Bob as he unravels layers of deceit and intrigue far beyond anything he expects.


Are you ready for that interview?

First question-bit of a cliche-how did you get into writing?

I spent my first 17 years following my family – my father was a Royal Air Force navigator – around the world, a process that involved seven schools and a dozen different postal addresses. I went to Hull University in 1975, spending my time there meeting my wife Maureen, hitch-hiking around Great Britain, and doing just enough actual work to gain a reasonable degree in that most useful of subjects, philosophy.

The next step seemed obvious. I researched and wrote A Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Great Britain, which was published by Penguin Books in 1983. The urge to write never left me. Eyes Turned Skywards, published by Fledgling Press was my first novel and The Danger of Life my second.

Do you write full time & if so, have you always done this?

No. When I’m writing it tends to be for fairly intensive periods, but it’s never been and probably never will be a full-time occupation. For me, the process of thinking about a book, developing ideas and doing the research can take much longer than the writing itself. Apart from anything else, I also help my wife Maureen run the tourism website Undiscovered Scotland.

Do you have a particular writing style or genre that you prefer to write?

The answer has to be no. My first book was non-fiction and my two published novels are historical thrillers set in Scotland during World War Two. There are two more in the series of WW2 novels completed, but like everything else, the question of how they will emerge into the light of day will have to await the world's return to something closer to normality. I’ve also written two contemporary thrillers that will probably need more work in a post coronavirus world; and I’m currently working on a young adult novel set in Scotland during the isolation and social distancing brought on by coronavirus. I’m writing it with advice and input from my 10-year-old grandson Alistair.

How do you develop your characters as you write, are any of them based on real people?

I collect stories that interest me about real historical people and some of them do find their way into my books. The two central characters in my thrillers set during World War Two both take as their starting points parts of the stories of real people.

What was the inspiration behind your book?

It was when I stumbled across the real-world story of the crash of the flying boat carrying the Duke of Kent, the king’s younger brother, on a remote hillside in Caithness in August 1942 that the idea of Eyes Turned Skywards began to coalesce into something tangible.

What is your writing process-do you plan it out first? Write a bit at a time?

It takes me a long time to produce a general idea and a sense of what the book’s about; where it starts; and where it needs to end. The background research then takes a lot of effort, especially for a historical thriller where I need the details to feel exactly right to the reader. Then I set off on the writing itself, which is as much a voyage of exploration for me as I hope the result is for the reader. I try to stay mentally a chapter or two ahead of myself. But most ideas emerge from the process of the writing itself. I simply couldn’t produce a detailed plan and then stick to it: but I know that works for some writers.

How much of you is reflected in your writing?

Probably more than I’d be comfortable with if I thought about it too deeply!

What kind of research did you have to do before/during writing behind your book?

My World War Two thrillers require a huge amount of detailed research to try to get them feeling just right. That involves online and book research into the history and geography, backed up by detailed step by step checking on the ground: which can be a challenge nearly eight decades after the books are set. Because of the way I write, I will usually have to make a second trip after the first draft is complete, to check the detail of the locations I actually used, not just those I intended to use.

How much attention do you pay to the reviews that you get?

I suspect I’m in the majority of writers who care a lot about feedback from reviewers and readers.

Are friends and family supportive of your writing?

Extremely! For example, for Eyes Turned Skywards my wife Maureen joined me on a long and very boggy trek across Caithness in February to get to the memorials at the site of the air crash that killed the Duke of Kent.

How do you feel leading up to your publication day?

Nervous!

Which other authors inspire you or are there any you particularly enjoy reading?

Many: probably too many to list, but I’d start with Richard Bach, Arthur Ransome, Tolkein… and on and on.

Finally...what are you working on right now?

I’m currently working on a young adult novel set in Scotland during the isolation and social distancing brought on by coronavirus. I’m writing it with advice and input from my 10-year-old grandson Alistair.

About the Author


Ken Lussey spent his first 17 years following his family - his father was a Royal Air Force navigator - around the world, a process that involved seven schools and a dozen different postal addresses. He went to Hull University in 1975, spending his time there meeting his wife Maureen, hitch-hiking around Great Britain, and doing just enough actual work to gain a reasonable degree in that most useful of subjects, philosophy. The next step seemed obvious. He researched and wrote A Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Great Britain, which was published by Penguin Books in 1983. An inexplicable regression into conformity saw him become a civil servant for the next couple of decades, during which time he fulfilled the long-held ambition of moving to Scotland. In more recent times he has helped Maureen establish the website Undiscovered Scotland as the ultimate online guide to Scotland. Eyes Turned Skywards is his first novel.

Thanks so much to Ken for stopping by the blog today. 



Thursday, 4 June 2020

Gray Genesis by Alan McDermott @Jambalian @lovebooksgroup #BookBlitz

Today we are celebrating the release of Gray Genesis by Alan McDermott. The 7th Tom Gray novel. Gray Genesis is the prequel and it is set in Afghanistan a few years before Gray Justice. The Book is out now and you can click here to order your copy today.

Here's what it's all about...

Tom Gray is back in his most explosive adventure yet!
 Afghanistan.  As the war on terror intensifies, Taliban leader Abdul al-Hussain has plans to turn the tide in his favour.  His objective: a US virologist named Miriam Dagher.  She’s about to pay a visit to the land of her birth, and al-Hussain has her in his sights.
 Out to stop al-Hussain is Sergeant Tom Gray, SAS veteran and leader of 8 Troop.  His team are tasked with disrupting Taliban operations, snatching high-profile targets and wreaking havoc on enemy supply lines.  Their missions are routine, until the Taliban unleashes a new breed of warrior.
 Gray Genesis is a prequel to the million-selling Tom Gray series, a familiar blend of intrigue, camaraderie and explosive action.

About the Author
Alan McDermott has an eclectic work history, with roles ranging from developing software for the NHS to shovelling custard powder in a food packing factory.  He tried his hand at writing in 1990, but after completing half a draft, he started a new job and threw it in a drawer.  It wasn’t until 2010 that he picked up his pen again, and published his first novel, Gray Justice, in 2011.  Gray Resurrection and Gray Redemption soon followed, and his success as a self-published author attracted the attention of Thomas & Mercer an Amazon publishing imprint.  They commissioned three more books in the Gray series, plus a spinoff called Trojan.  In 2014, Alan gave up his day job to become a full-time writer, and has written three books in a new series (Run and Hide, Seek and Destroy and Fight to Survive) featuring CIA assassin Nolene Driscoll.  He also has a standalone thriller called Motive, which has a new lead in Ryan Anderson.

May Reading Wrap Up 2020

Well May was basically brought to you by Bout of Books. I didn't read a whole lot before this readathon and I didn't read a whole lot afterwards. You can see my Bout of Books Wrap Up post here. It ended up being a bit of a sprint to the finish when it comes to completing my May TBR. You can read that post here...

As always I will divide my May reading into the type of books that I read and leave links to any reviews I have already posted so you can see my thoughts.

Ebooks











Physical Books









Audiobooks


My Review























This Month's Videos...










Wednesday, 3 June 2020

Guest Review: A Perfect Cornish Escape by Phillipa Ashley

Summer in Cornwall is the perfect time for a fresh start…
Seven years ago, Marina Hudson’s husband was lost at sea. She vowed to love him for the rest of her life – but when kind-hearted Lachlan arrives in Porthmellow, should she deny herself another chance at happiness?
Tiff Trescott was living life to the full as a journalist in London – until her boyfriend’s betrayal brought it all crashing down. Fleeing to her cousin Marina’s cottage, Tiff feels like a fish-out-of-water. And when brooding local Dirk wins a day with her in a charity auction, she’s thrown headfirst into Cornish life.
This summer promises new beginnings for both Tiff and Marina. But are they too good to be true?


Review: This is the third book in the Porthmellow series by Phillipa Ashley. Like the preceding two books in the series, A Perfect Cornish Summer and A Perfect Cornish Christmas, this story is set in the small, and sadly fictional, Cornish seaside village of Porthmellow. Although they have a common setting, and several recurring characters, the books can all be read as stand-alones. As with the other two books in the series, I found this one compelling reading; I was quickly drawn into the lives of the characters and all too quickly reached the end.

The main female characters in the story are Marina, a local teacher whose husband was lost at sea some years previously, and her journalist cousin, Tiff. Following some disastrous events affecting her personal and professional life in London, Tiff is staying temporarily with her cousin in Porthmellow. She soon meets up with local man, Dirk, known to be a moody character. Initially, the two clash, but a friendship gradually forms as time passes. Meanwhile, Marina meets Lachlan, a rather taciturn newcomer to the village; although she is drawn to him, can she get him to open up to her and learn what lies beneath the surface? It looks as if both girls may have the chance of a new start, but will it work out for one or both of them?

I can highly recommend this book for fans of Phillipa Ashley like myself, lovers of Cornwall or readers who just enjoy a heart-warming tale. I found this an easy read, but not lacking in depth and detail. There is also a nice feeling of friendship and community throughout. For readers of the other books in the series, there are old friends to meet up with - always a pleasure for me. The four principal characters all have interesting and perfectly believable back stories of their own; the individual issues they are dealing with are heartbreaking at times. I enjoyed the way that although the four formed into two couples, they each had very different sorts of relationships. There is an interesting twist towards the latter part of the story, which led to a very dramatic incident; the twist I could see coming, but the drama I could not. In my opinion this is another hit by Phillipa Ashley, and I shall be looking out for her next book.


To order your copy now, just click the link: UK or US

Tuesday, 2 June 2020

Blog Tour: Interview With Alan Camrose Author of Lost in Plain Sight @AlanCamrose @lovebooksgroup #lovebookstours


Today is my stop on the blog tour for Lost in Plain Sight by Alan Camrose. I have an interview with the author today and if you like the sound of that, you can click here to order your copy now. Don't forget to check out the other stops on the tour for more exclusive content and reviews. 

Here's what it's all about...

A Magic Circle wizard has been brutally killed on the English south coast.

Sam Franklin, Pagoda and Meyra are on the case; as a cat, Pagoda would rather get into the case and have a nap.

Sam’s a senior wizard who doesn't want to follow in the dead man's footsteps; Meyra's still struggling to fit into our world.

They walk on and under the mean streets of Brighton, hunting the killer (and the missing body). They find a whole lot more: a murderous dark magic conspiracy preying on the poor and vulnerable in our society, a werewolf with exquisite dentistry, a goblin fatale and a sat-nav with serious personality issues.

This fur-raising adventure will introduce you to the dark corners of our world where magic works and the monsters often wear nicely tailored suits.


Are you ready for that interview?

First question-bit of a cliche-how did you get into writing?

I’ve always written, one way or another. As a lawyer, I just had to write different kinds of stories.

Do you write full time & if so, have you always done this?

I do write full time. A recent and liberating development.

Do you have a particular writing style or genre that you prefer to write?

I try to be as natural as I can when I’m writing and can’t help letting bits of me creep into the writing. That feels right in fantasy-thrillers.

How do you develop your characters as you write, are any of them based on real people?

Everyone tends to be inspired by and based on someone, more a snippet of someone, including me. Usually exaggerated or modified for dramatic effect (and to head off awkward meetings in dark alleys with vengeful sources of inspiration). They can come from anywhere: friends and family (these are the more personally dangerous sources) and takes on characters in the newspapers, books, whatever. No source left unturned.

What was the inspiration behind your book?

My cat, my job, my love of Brighton as a place, a range of things that all came together seemingly at random.

What is your writing process-do you plan it out first? Write a bit at a time?

I tend to go with the flow, trying not to plan too much at the start, then see where it’s going and try to make it come together. A mixture, I guess.

How much of you is reflected in your writing?

There’s quite a lot of me left on the page when I write. Sam Franklin in my book is probably quite similar to me in various ways, although my magic tricks stop at badly concealed coloured ribbons stuffed up my sleeves – mind you, that did work on the kids when they were very small.

What kind of research did you have to do before/during writing behind your book?

I try to get the details right, so it’s the little stuff, and that takes a load of time. And wandering around Brighton was fun, taking pics and soaking up the place, doing hard-core research on fish and chip menus and local beers…

How much attention do you pay to the reviews that you get?

I’ve been lucky with reviews so far, but I try not to think about them. I developed a thick skin when I was a lawyer, so it’s all good.

Are friends and family supportive of your writing?

Very much so. Couldn’t do it without them!

How do you feel leading up to your publication day?

Like a goat in the jungle being tethered to a well secured stake by a strong rope.

Which other authors inspire you or are there any you particularly enjoy reading?

The two go together, I suppose. There are too many to list, but my rocks throughout my life have been: Terry Pratchett, Isaac Asimov and Robert B Parker.

Others include - in no special order - Jim Butcher, Raymond Chandler, PG Wodehouse, William Gibson, Lee Child, Sebastian Faulks and Robert Harris.

Finally...what are you working on right now?

I have three projects cooking:

A supernatural thriller where safety can bring its own dangers.

A non-fiction book about where we sleep.

A sequel to Lost In Plain Sight. Sam finds himself in the movies. All of them.  


Thanks to Alan for stopping by the blog today!




Blog Tour: Interview With Effie Kammenou Author of Love is What You Bake of it (The Meraki Series Book 1) @EffieKammenou @lovebooksgroup


Today is my stop on the blog tour for What You Bake of it (The Meraki Series Book 1) by Effie Kemmenou. I have an interview with the author today and if you like the sound of that, you can click here to order your copy now. Don't forget to check out the other stops on the tour for more exclusive content and reviews.

Here's what it's all about...

The only love Kally Andarakis is baking is in the form of the sweet treats she whips up in her café, The Coffee Klatch.

Kally never believed herself to be a person worthy of love, but when an intoxicating man she considered out of her league pursues her, she risks everything to be with him. Later, when tragedy strikes, truths are revealed that leave Kally brokenhearted and untrusting.

Eight years later, Kally is a successful pastry chef running the café she’d always dreamed of owning. With a home of her own, a profession she’s passionate about, and the support and love of friends and family, Kally is content with the life she has carved out for herself.
Until the day Max Vardaxis walks into her café…

With arguing parents, meddling relatives, an overly energetic grandmother, a man-crazy best friend, and the long ago, mysterious disappearance of a grandfather, this new man in town is just one more complication in Kally’s life, if not the main one.

Kally must now decide whether to keep her heart safe or to once again take a ‘whisk on love.’


Are you ready for that interview?

First question-bit of a cliché-how did you get into writing?
My mother passed away from pancreatic cancer in 2012. I wanted to be positive and strong for my father, sisters, daughters, and nieces. But eventually, something had to give, and I had to channel my grief in some way. This is when I began to write, creating a character that honored my mother’s loving spirit, elegance, and her culture.
Evanthia’s Gift was my first effort at a project of considerable length. I had written scenes and children’s plays, but never a full novel, much less one that was 560 pages.
Do you write full time & if so, have you always done this?
I do have a part-time day job as an optical lab technician, but I would say that I spend an equal amount of time, if not more writing.
Do you have a particular writing style or genre that you prefer to write?

I write women’s fiction and contemporary romance novels. I prefer a series rather than standalone, but I may write one in the future. I know that when I read characters that interest me, I want to know more about them and their lives. The series format gives the reader the option to continue with their ‘book friends.’ I also prefer to make each book in the series to conclude satisfactorily. It should be up to the reader if they want to continue, not feel as though they have to in order to find out the outcome of the story.

How do you develop your characters as you write, are any of them based on real people?
Many of my characters are based on real people or a combination of people. Some are purely out of my imagination or were inspired by an observance while people-watching.
I develop my characters in the way I was taught to create a character for an acting role. The script doesn’t always give you all the information regarding the character’s life or past. Still these details need to be developed in your mind or the result will be a one-dimensional character. Character motivation is key. This will determine how he/she speaks, interacts with others, and how he/she handles situations.

What was the inspiration behind your book?

This book was pure fun for me. Years ago, I played with the idea of opening up a café with an international flair. I went as far as to take a class at the library on writing a business plan. I had a journal of ideas and recipes. I knew what I wanted the place to look like and how I wanted to present my menu. I later decided that I liked cooking and baking for friends and family, but doing it every day and waking up at the crack of dawn was not for me. I love the fact that my efforts were not wasted. Kally, the main character in Love is What You Bake of it, gets to realize my dream café.
An actual event also inspired the meet-cute. You will have to read it to see how an errant license plate became the catalyst for a new romance.

What is your writing process-do you plan it out first? Write a bit at a time?

By the time I sit down to write, I have already figured out what I want to happen in the story. I know the beginning and a basic idea of how I want to get to the end. The rest comes as I write and do my research.
Some days, I’m able to write for hours at a stretch. Other days, only an hour or two. It all depends on what is going on at the time.

How much of you is reflected in your writing?

I believe almost every author will admit that there is a bit of themselves in every character they write. It might be a trait, a habit, or even something as minuscule as a food preference. My love for baking and my past desire to open my own café is what Kally and I have in common. I would say that Evanthia’s Gift is the most personal of all the books I’ve written. It was the most emotional for me to get down on paper. It was written from my heart and soul.

What kind of research did you have to do before/during writing behind your book?
It depends on the book. For Love is What You Bake of it, I had researched Greek politics and history during the 1960s when the monarchy was overthrown. Although the book is set mainly in present day Long Island, NY, there is a subplot that drifts back to that period of time.

How much attention do you pay to the reviews that you get?

I read every single review. If a reader is going to take their time out to write it, then I am going to read it. I greatly appreciate those reviews.

Are friends and family supportive of your writing?

Yes, they are all very supportive. I have an fantastic group of cheerleaders! They are all way better at promoting my books than I am!
How do you feel leading up to your publication day?

I feel both excited and nervous. All three books in The Gift Saga Trilogy received very favorable reviews. Love is What you Bake of it is different than that series. It’s lighter and, although there are some serious subjects touched upon, it doesn’t delve as deeply into them. I knew some readers would love the humor and sheer entertainment of the book, but I feared others might not think it was up to the standard they expected from me. In light of what’s been happening in the world, I think a fun book was just what readers needed right about now.

Which other authors inspire you or are there any you particularly enjoy reading?

The most inspiring contemporary author for me is Sylvain Reynard. I recently commented during one of his many Facebook author chats, naming him the Master of Words, and wished I could be his apprentice. But I have admiration for so many other authors as well. I also read books written by Adriana Trigiani, Chanel Cleeton, Elin Hildebrand, Coleen Hoover, Deborah Harkness, and A.L. Jackson, just to name a few.
Finally...what are you working on right now?

I’m writing the second book in The Meraki Series. This story will focus on Kally’s sister, Mia, a graphic designer for a magazine in NYC.

About the Author

Effie Kammenou is a believer that it is never too late to chase your dreams, follow your heart, or change your career. She is proof of that. At one time, long ago, she'd hoped that by her age, she would have had an Oscar in her hand after a successful career as an actor. Instead, she worked in the optical field for 40 years while raising her two daughters.
In 2015, three years after the death of her mother from pancreatic cancer, she published her debut novel, Evanthia’s Gift, book one in a women’s fiction, multigenerational love story and family saga, inspired by her mother and her Greek heritage. Kammenou continues to pick her father’s brain for stories of his family’s life in Lesvos, Greece, and their journey to America. Her interview with him was published in the nationally circulated magazine Reminisce.
 Evanthia’s Gift: Book One in The Gift Saga was a 2016 finalist in the Readers Favorite Book Awards.  Waiting for Aegina: Book Two in The Gift Saga was awarded finalist status in the 2019 International Book Awards and Chasing Petalouthes, the last book in the trilogy, had also placed in the Readers Favorite Book Awards for the 2018 contest.
Her latest novel, the first book in a new contemporary romance series, is now complete. Love is What You Bake of It, follows Kally's path to independence despite her sometimes stifling family and her tumultuous road to finding love. But it wouldn't be a Kammenou novel without a delve into the past, or the references to mouth-watering foods.
 Effie Kammenou is a first-generation Greek-American who lives on Long Island with her husband and two daughters. When she’s not writing or posting recipes on her food blog, aptly named cheffieskitchen, you can find her entertaining family and friends or traveling for ‘research.’
 As an avid cook and baker, a skill she learned from watching her Athenian mother, she incorporated traditional Greek family recipes throughout the books for a little extra ‘flavor.’
She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Theater Arts from Hofstra University. 
For updates on promotions, events and new releases, follow Effie on Social media
 Newsletter signup -  http://eepurl.com/bIoJl1

Thanks so much to Effie for stopping by the blog today!